Former Amazon finance manager Laksha Bohra and family charged with insider trading


A former finance manager for Amazon.com and two of her family members were charged on Monday with insider trading by the Securities and Exchange Commission, which accused the family of making $1.4 million from unlawful trading.



a sign on the side of a building: SEATTLE, WA - APRIL 30: A person walks by an Amazon Go store at the downtown Amazon campus on April 30, 2020 in Seattle, Washington. Amazon recorded sales of $75.4 billion in the first three months of the year as many consumers increased their online purchases, up 26% over last year, but with net income for the same period falling nearly 31% due to costs of managing the coronavirus pandemic. (Photo by Lindsey Wasson/Getty Images)


© Lindsey Wasson/Getty Images
SEATTLE, WA – APRIL 30: A person walks by an Amazon Go store at the downtown Amazon campus on April 30, 2020 in Seattle, Washington. Amazon recorded sales of $75.4 billion in the first three months of the year as many consumers increased their online purchases, up 26% over last year, but with net income for the same period falling nearly 31% due to costs of managing the coronavirus pandemic. (Photo by Lindsey Wasson/Getty Images)

The complaint alleges that Laksha Bohra, a senior manager in Amazon’s tax department, leaked confidential information about the company’s financial performance to her husband Viky Bohra. The husband and his father then traded on the confidential information in 11 separate accounts managed by the family, according to the SEC complaint.

Bohra’s lawyers didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment. Amazon declined to comment on the charges.

The SEC said the trading took place in advance of Amazon’s earnings announcements between January 2016 and July 2018.

“We allege that the Bohras repeatedly and systematically used Amazon’s confidential information for their own gain,” said Erin Schneider, director of the SEC’s San Francisco Regional Office. “Employees with access to confidential, potentially market-moving corporate information may not use that information to enrich themselves, their friends, or their families.”

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